What is an Intervention & When is It Necessary?

There are thousands of people who feel helpless as a spouse, child, or loved one suffers from an addiction, untreated mental illness, requires help recovering from a traumatic event or other serious problem. If you have a loved one who is suffering – you are not alone. Addiction, untreated mental illness and trauma can take a toll on families and loved ones who may feel lost, hopeless, and be unaware of how to get help and the resources available to them.

 

One of the most effective resources, is often the most overlooked - an intervention. An intervention, by definition is an action taken to improve a situation. An intervention is a deliberate process by which change is introduced into a person’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.  An intervention may be necessary if your loved one is struggling with untreated addiction or mental illness and you are looking for a safe, effective way to get them into treatment.

 

There are many styles of interventions, the three main styles used today include the ARISE® Model, the Johnson Model and the Family Systemic Model. During an ARISE® intervention a family support system is mobilized and the person of concern is invited to join the process in a non-threatening way. The goal of an ARISE® Intervention is to break the cycle of repeated disappointment and failure without the blame, shame or guilt that accompanies the disease. An ARISE® Invitation Intervention® is directed to getting your loved on into treatment with the least possible effort through a loving, compassionate and non-blaming series of family meetings.

It is important that your intervention be directed and organized by a skilled and qualified professional known as an “interventionist” – if you are utilizing the ARISE® Model this person will be a Certified ARISE® Interventionist. The interventionist will guide the family members and designated friends in the organization of a series of intervention meetings, in the ARISE® model your Certified ARISE® Interventionist will continue to work with your family even after your loved one has accepted treatment – this is known as  ARISE® Continuing Care and aims to assist all family members in healing and recovery. The family members will continue to receive help by learning to modify their mode of communication with each other, to stop any enabling behaviors toward the addicted person, to re-establish their own feelings of self-esteem and work towards their own recovery. 

 

An intervention is not the “cure,” but the first step on the road to recovery.  The ARISE® Network has Certified ARISE® Interventionists around the world who are prepared to help you and your family on the road to healing.  

 

 

SOURCES: 

http://www.associationofinterventionspecialists.org/what-is-intervention/